March 31, 2011

Maryland Auto Accident Update: Recovering from Traumatic Brain Injuries can be Frustrating, Yet Also Amazing

by Lebowitz & Mzhen

Bodily injuries suffered as a result of an automobile accident can range from minor cuts and bruises, to broken bones and closed-head injuries. The latter, also referred to as traumatic brain injuries, can spell serious trouble for victims of traffic collisions. Yet as scary as head trauma can be, the recovery can turn out to be quite amazing, according to some experts.

As a Baltimore car and truck accident lawyer and Maryland personal injury attorney, I and my colleagues have seen the aftermath of many car, truck and motorcycle wrecks, as well as the human toll. But as the story of U.S. Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords has shown, the road to recovery from traumatic brain injury can be just this side of miraculous.

While it’s surely too early to tell -- according to medical professionals a patient’s progress in this area is best measured at the six- to 12-month mark following a closed-head injury -- Ms. Giffords progress shows that there is hope for many people who have suffered serious trauma to the brain.

According to a recent article, while recovery from closed-head injuries can be a long and uncertain road, patients can exhibit recoveries that are nothing short of amazing. Experts in this medical field urge caution and remind the public that traumatic brain injuries take many forms and lead to various outcomes.

Gunshot wounds to the head, as well as serious brain injuries caused by high-speed car and motorcycle crashes can result in extensive damage to the various parts of the brain controlling speech, motor control and memory. Recovery can take years, and start with a grueling routine of speech and physical therapies. Even the most simple tasks have to be relearned, such as getting dressed, eating and speaking again.

Still, it’s no secret that the brain itself has tremendous capacity to rebuild and renew damaged areas. Evidence from research with animals indicates that the brain has the ability to reorganize and regenerate, producing new synapses as it grows additional neurons and blood vessels.

Experts say that the process of recovering from traumatic brain injuries can take years, even after initial improvements. In fact, many victims continue to make progress as far as three to five years later. For Ms. Giffords, we can only wish her the best for a swift and full recovery.


Recovery from traumatic brain injury a long, uncertain road, BaltimoreSun.com, January 21, 2011